How to Make Herbal Infused Oil for Salves and Herb Products

Herbal infused oil has multiple uses, and is one of the easiest herbal preparations you’ll ever make. I constantly get this question, “how do I make herb infused oils?” And the answer is always extremely easy! One of my favorites is calendula infused oil. It’s so easy and versitle!

Of course, there are a few ways you can make the infused oils. I make herbal oil for things like calendula infused oil for skin care, chamomile infused oil for soaps and salves, and even cayenne infused oil for joint pain.

Let’s take the next few minutes to talk about the two main ways you can make your own herb infused oils. I’ll also talk about how to use them in various different herbal products and preparations, as well as simply by themselves.

Common Herbs for Herbal Infused Oils

While you can use just about any herb for an herbal infused oil, there are some that are more common than others. That’s because we normally make an infused oil to use for skin care, or to use in another herbal product like salves, soaps, balms, lotions, and ointments.

They don’t always have to have a medicinal purpose, though. Some herbs, like chamomile, are just nice and refreshing. They feel great on the skin and can be used aromatically on the skin

Likewise, you can make an herb infused oil for culinary purposes too. These oils are great drizzled over meat, pasta, and other cuisines!

Here are some common herbs to use for herbal infused oils:

  • chamomile
  • calendula
  • sage
  • thyme
  • oregano
  • peppermint
  • cayenne
  • rosemary
  • basil
  • echinacea
straining Calendula infused oil into jars

How to Make an Herb Infused Oil

There are two main ways to make an herb infused oil. There is the easy and quick way, and then there’s the easy and long way. I’m all about quick and easy, so I normally choose the first method I’m going to share with you.

Either way, the ingredients are the same. Make sure you are use a 1:5 (weight:volume) ratio when measuring (example: 1 ounce herb to 5 fl ounces oil). Use oils like jojoba, sweet almond, or olive oil. You can crush up your herbs to make the oil cover them more completely if necessary.

It’s also important to know that using dried or wilted herbs is often best for infused oils. They don’t have as high a water content, which can cause the oil to go rancid. Some herbalists believe that losing that water content loses medicinal value, but that’s not true. All they are losing is water content. The medicinal value is in the herb itself, and the volatile oils within the herb.


How to Make an Infused Oil in the Oven

  1. Measure out your dried herbs and oil into a mason jar. 
  2. Turn your oven to 300 degrees farenheit. Once it reaches temperature, turn the oven off and place your jars of herbs and oil (uncovered) into the oven. Allow to set in the closed oven for 3 hours.
  3. Once the 3 hours passes, remove the jars from the oven and drain the oil into a new, clean jar—separating the herbs from the oil as much as possible through a mesh strainer or cheese cloth.
  4. Once your oils have cooled, cap and store until ready to use.

You can store these oils for up to one year in the pantry or medicine cabinet, away from direct sunlight and severe fluctuating temperatures.


How to Make an Infused Oil in the Sunlight

  • Measure out your dried herbs and oil into a mason jar. Make sure you are using a 1:5 ratio when measuring (example: 1 ounce herb to 5 fl ounces oil). Use oils like jojoba, sweet almond, or olive oil. You can crush up your herbs to make the oil cover them more completely if necessary.
  • Place a cap on the jar tightly and set your jar in a sunny window for the next 4 weeks. Be sure you shake the jar twice a day to ensure the herbs are infusing well into the oils.
  • When ready, strain the herbs and oil the same as you would in step 3 above. Store your oil for up to one year in the pantry of medicine cabinet, away from direct sunlight and severe fluctuating temperatures.

How to Make An Herbal Salve

peppermint herbal infused oils make great salves

Ways to Use an Herb Infused Oil

Now that you’ve learned how easy it is to make these oils, you’ll need to learn how to use them!

Topically

Simply use the oils as-is as a regular skin-care regime, or to help heal from the outside in. This works well for things like eczema, psoriasis, dry skin, wounds, stretch marks, and even joint and muscle pain.

Make Herbal Products

Use the oils to create your own herbal salves, ointments, lotion bars, and balms. You can even use them in things like homemade deodorant and chapstick! One of my favorites is calendula infused oil. I use it in most of my salves because it’s great for overall skin health!

How to Make Herbal Lotion Bars

Whatever you choose to do with your infused oils, you can’t go wrong. As I mentioned before, you can even create culinary infused oils with herbs that pair well with meats and other meals.

To learn more about herbalism, check out my book, The Homesteader’s Herbal Companion, and some of the other posts on my website!

Other posts you may enjoy:

  • How to Make an Herbal Salve
  • How to Make Herbal Lotion Bars
  • Medicinal Uses of Mullein—Grow, Harvest, Use
  • Homemade Cough Syrup | Eucalyptus & Thyme
  • Homemade Herbal Chai Tea Mix
  • How to Make Plantain Leaf Herbal Soap
  • Essential Oils and Herbs for Ear Infections
  • Flu Fighting Elderberry and Astragalus Syrup (recipe)

The post How to Make Herbal Infused Oil for Salves and Herb Products appeared first on Amy Fewell — The Fewell Homestead.

Source: thefewellhomestead.com

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